August Colors and Details

WoodFrog20Aug17#2207E2c5x7

Sub-adult Wood Frog out and about on a rainy day

Fawn7Aug17#1487E2c5x7

White-tail fawn foraging in cultivated fields

TouchMeNot14Aug17#1969E5c5x7

Bumblebee feasting on Touch-me-not (Jewelweed)

Teasel12Aug17#1861E2c8x10

Teasel at ground level, the 6-foot stalk flattened by flood waters 

 

HumbirdMoth10Aug17#1766E7c5x7

Clearwing Hummingbird Moth on Phlox (1 of 2)

HumbirdMoth9Aug17#1584E5c8x10

FrogID16Aug17#2087E5c5x7

Small pool of spring water that has quenched the thirst of 3 dogs during 30 years of trail walking

WhiteAdmiral17Aug17#2191E5c8x10

White Admiral, wings upright and showing its true colors

Photos by NB Hunter (August, 2017). © All Rights Reserved.

14 thoughts on “August Colors and Details

    • Thanks Lisa. No major trips or events of late, but there’s always something to see in between chores! Your adventure at Montezuma Natl Wildlife Refuge was intriguing….I must do that sometime.

    • Thanks Anne. My old dog wasn’t feeling well enough for a walk on that morning so the frog wasn’t forced to dive for cover. For me, a sad moment of reflection but a satisfying capture with morning light.

  1. I really admire this collection of such strong images of beautiful creatures. There is something particularly soulful in the fawn’s expression that keeps drawing me back. I am so sorry that your elderly dog is not well, and I send you both best wishes.

  2. A very beautiful and diverse series of photos to go along with this post’s title. I am partial to those of the Hummingbird Moth and the Admiral, but the rest are winners also.

    • Thanks for the great feedback Hien. These posts are really a window into my daily life and the Phlox X Hummingbird Moth experience has become an annual August ritual. I captured some very nice images of the White Admiral nectaring on Knapweed but when it left to perch in a spruce tree I saw an opportunity to capture a less familiar scene, showing the colors of the underside of the wing.

    • Thank you! These moths move quickly from one small Phlox flower to another, rarely presenting an easy target. I have to shoot in bright sunlight and crank up the ISO to get what I want. I still delete many more than I save, mostly because I’ve failed to lock onto the target or capture a desirable position and background.

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