The Tail End of Winter 2018


Northern Cardinal at the feeders in a snow storm


Abandoned farm buildings and an active hunting shelter


Deer foraging in the corn stubble, a common scene in late afternoon


A matriarch defending her discovery of waste grain


Doe and fawn foraging in a sheltered willow bottom


Mature Bald Eagle, just before dark, in the rain


The resident Red Squirrel with a not-so-red tail


Thinking of warmer days, fake bugs drifting drag-free, and hungry trout


Roots of a centuries-old maple tree, undercut by spring water

Photos by NB Hunter. © All Rights Reserved.


Early May Highlights, 2016

I’ve captured a sample of early May in Central New York, often dodging rain drops in the process. My mother had more than a passing interest in nature and would have loved this post.

She liked flowers, cultivated or wild, didn’t much matter.


Fading glory: Red Trillium in a moist ravine, past peak bloom


Willow (one of many species of wild willow shrubs)


Wild Juneberry (also Serviceberry, Amelanchier or Shadbush)

She kept a bird feeder and enjoyed her backyard visitors. Early May was peak migration and full of surprises.


Goldfinch perched near a Nyjer seed feeder

Of course everyone loves babies. These family photos would have been plastered all over the wall (and the real family photos pushed aside)!


Family of Canadian Geese (there were 8 goslings in all, just a few days old)


Bald Eagle, tearing small pieces from a kill to feed her 3 youngsters


Raising young is a team effort: parent #2 arrives with a duck in its grasp (determined from another image in the sequence)!

Happy Mother’s Day

Photos by NB Hunter. © All Rights Reserved.


Hunting Deer on Thin Ice

Late winter, with a combination of ice and open water on surface waters, presents a fleeting window of opportunity for nature photography. My recent posts on ducks, muskrats and mink were the result of this phenomenon. It was 60 degrees F today, the ice is melting quickly, and the window is about to close. I plan to shoot until it does.

This morning I followed up on a report of eagles feeding on a dead deer on the thin ice of a local reservoir. I found three bald eagles and a coyote in the area. Two mature eagles were on the carcass and a juvenile was a couple hundred feet away, near the distant shore. The coyote made a brief appearance, hunting the far shoreline and ecotone. Much of what I observed was beyond the reach of my gear, but I managed to capture the essence of the experience!






Photos by NB Hunter. © All Rights Reserved.

Late Winter Faces

Many wildlife stories are unfolding in Central New York as the deep snow and unprecedented cold weather persist.  For now, I’ll pretend the glass is half full, rather than nearly empty, and present selected images from February 28 through today.







Photos by NB Hunter. © ,All Rights Reserved.

The Resident Eagles

This is a follow-up to a recent post on a resident pair of Bald Eagles that are cruising the airways for carrion. In this case, I was able to capture one of the pair in flight as it circled prior to coming in for a meal on a road-killed deer. The site is active farmland, planted in a cover crop. It’s not far (as an eagle flies) from a small reservoir.




Photos by NB Hunter. ©  All Rights Reserved.

Our National Emblem

Thirty five years ago photographs of Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) would have made front-page-headlines. It was then that this magnificent bird of prey, our national emblem and a symbolic, spiritual bird to Native Americans, had to be protected by the Endangered Species Act. Pesticides were a major culprit, accumulating to toxic levels in the food chain and causing reproductive failures in predatory species. Since then, the Bald Eagle has made a remarkable come-back throughout North America and was removed from the Endangered Species list in 2007.

In the late 19th century many reservoirs were built in central New York to provide water for an extensive canal system and today, much of the land adjacent to them is a mosaic of farms and woodlands. This is good eagle habitat and eagle sightings are not at all unusual now, especially when a carcass shows up in an open field not far from a reservoir. Although fish are a dietary staple, Bald Eagles are opportunistic feeders and will spend several days competing with crows, vultures and other scavengers for the meat on a deer carcass.


Mature Bald Eagle feeding on a deer carcass in mid-November

Earlier in the week, a friend called to tell me about a great photo op near home – a Bald Eagle (sometimes a pair) feeding on a deer carcass. I was fortunate enough to find one bird at the site on two different days. This post, including the photo above and the gallery that follows, features some highlights from that experience.

Photos by NB Hunter. © All Rights Reserved.