Snowy Highlights, Feb. 2017

Most of our snow will be gone by the end of the week. There will be more, but I feel the need to post these wonderful winter snow scenes while they’re still fresh in my memory!

farm20feb171426e7c3x5

Harvested corn field in winter

turks18feb171303e2c8x10

Eastern Wild Turkey foraging for waste grain

stream18feb171369e6c5x7_edited-1

Spring-fed stream and geese, with a mature oak tree in the center

groundhog20feb171442e2c4x6

Groundhog emerging from hibernation, 20Feb2017

trail15feb171010e3c5x7

Woodland trail after a heavy, wet snow

deer12feb170694e3c8x10

Young whitetail doe

stream19feb171400e2c4x6

Small woodland stream, framed by mature hemlocks and sugar maples

doves16feb171127e2c8x10

Mourning doves taking flight

trail12innewsnow14feb170880e2c4x6

Woodland trail in sunshine and shadow

antler20feb171450e2c4x6

A shed deer antler exposed by melting snow

Photos by NB Hunter. © All Rights Reserved.

 

Dragonflies and Damselflies

Dragonflies and damselflies, insect order Odonata, are a fascinating inhabitant of summer landscapes. Wetlands and surface waters are rich habitats where many species can be observed hunting, breeding and perching. The placid, weed-choked water of a canal or pond are examples of good habitat.

12SpottedSkimmer5July12#089E

Twelve-spotted Skimmer, perching

CommonPondHawks12July13#091E

Common Pondhawks mating (male is blue, female green). This unique position is called the “mating wheel”.

Many species also travel far from water to hunt meadows, trails and forest edges, providing ample opportunities for close encounters just about anywhere. I enjoy watching dragonflies hunt the corridor of my upland trail for mosquitoes and other small insects. Perpetual motion, they zip up and down the trail with blazing speed, unpredictably stopping on a dime to hover or change direction. At times they seem to be following me, picking off insects as I flush them, much like the swallows do when I’m mowing.

Dragonfly11July13#002E

Dragonfly on grass in an upland meadow

I never truly appreciated the unusual morphology and beauty of the Odonata until I started photographing them. Magnification is transformative, revealing an artsy mix of vivid colors, perching behaviors and distinct body parts. Most family and friends will take issue with this, politely suggesting that I stick to butterflies when photographing insects and related wildlife. If you share that view, you must admit that the names  – Ebony Jewelwing, Boreal Bluet, Powdered Dancer, Comet Darner, Dragonhunter, Pondhawk, Meadowhawk, etc. – are very cool!

Pennant7July13#028E

Halloween Pennant; typically perch at the top of a meadow plant, face into the wind, and maintain stability with wings arched and moving in different directions

Dragonflies and damselflies are, like butterflies and many other insects, a “canary in the cage” with respect to environmental health. In fact, they might be one of our best indicators because, in addition to diverse, open habitats for adults to forage, the aquatic larval stage is reliant on wetlands and surface waters. It is therefore critical that we appreciate them for their ecological role as well as their unusual behavior and appearance. I’m hoping that my images convey all of these attributes and leave a lasting impression (a good one of course!).

Photos by NB Hunter. © All Rights Reserved.